Free seminars on 360 degree feedback and performance appraisals; please vote for your preferred option..!

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We are pleased to announce that this year’s series of free seminars is about to start from May and we thought it would be a good idea to invite you to vote for your preferred choice of topic and help us decide which one to run first!

The current seminar topics are ‘How to….’

If you would be interested in attending one of the seminars listed above, then simply:

1. Email me at john@bowlandsolutions.com
2. Cut & paste the title of your preferred seminar topic into the subject header.

We will then count up the votes and prioritise our schedule of seminars accordingly.

So if one of these topics is a burning issue, please email before Friday May 6th and get it scheduled sooner rather than later!

Thanks and we look forward to announcing the first seminar shortly.

John

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A Royal Wedding complete with 360 degree feedback behaviours

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With it being near impossible to not know there is a Royal Wedding this week (Friday, just in case you had missed it), I mused on the traditional wedding vows which are often the centrepiece of the ceremony whilst thinking about 360 degree feedback….I know I should get out more….

The vows lay out what both husband and wife can expect of each other in their married life together; love, care, support, respect, faithful, etc.

They convey both what they are committing to in terms of behaviour and set out the groundrules for what they want from their partner in marriage.

This is what we do with 360 degree feedback; we set out expectations and define behaviours which we believe will make the ‘marriage’ work – this might all sound rather tenuous by way of a link, but considering we often spend more time with our work colleagues than our spouses, it’s not a bad one.

John


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360 Degree Feedback; praising effort not just outputs

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 A neat little article caught my eye recently discussing the value of feedback which focuses on effort rather than just necessarily attributes; useful in 360 degree feedback.

The article in the BBC magazine here touches on how feedback presented as applauding just the attributes can have a negative effect; noticeably in students, praising effort by saying "I can see you worked hard in putting that presentation together" may actually yield better performance in the future than saying "You are great at presenting".

The latter can start to foster a ‘fixed mindset’ which sets people up to succeed or fail according to their beliefs around what they good at/bad at.

By comparison, the first phrase stimulates a ‘growth mindset’ whereby the student perceives that their success/failure is directly attributable to their effort and so can decide to make more of an effort next time if desired.

Interesting when it comes to our own children; how often do we go for effort rather than attribute….I have my own hand up here for sure!

John

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