Going beyond TNA; using 360 Degree Feedback for organisational change

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Often when we are involved in 360 degree feedback projects with our clients, we find ourselves delivering the face-to-face debriefs with the group of recipients, particularly if they are within the senior leadership team of the organisation.

Exploring the 360 report with the individual and identifying their own specific development areas is really just the starting point for leveraging the true value of 360 feedback.

It is relatively straightforward with an online 360 system to aggregate the data of all recipients and allow HR to then seen what the group-wide learning & development needs are and how they should be prioritised.

However, beyond this very effective means of conducting a TNA within the business, such data needs to be coupled with the anecdotal evidence gathered through the debrief conversations with the group of recipients themselves.

It is the comments from recipients during the debrief which add colour and depth to the development requirements, and these need to be skillfully drawn out through a review of the individual debrief conversations to see what is truly needed for that group of people.

Furthermore, and where the real power of 360 degree feedback lies, is in the strategic themes which inevitably emerge during the debrief conversations; if you speak with the top team in a business, you will quickly find the conversations highlight issues that are way beyond their own role.

Patterns may emerge which suggest very high-level issues such as poor vision and direction, a failure of communication from the top team downwards, a rumbling dissent among the employees which threatens to undermine the whole organisation.

We will present such findings back to the senior leadership team as a non-partisan party, and just like in a 360 debrief, ask "What do you notice?", "What is the impact of such feedback?" and "What does it suggest might be necessary organisational changes?".

360 degree feedback, correctly implemented, can go well beyond being an HR initiative and be seen as a critical tool in raising the awareness of the organisation and giving insight into what it needs to do to succeed.

John

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Last few free places remaining; 360 Feedback Seminar 31st May

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Places for our forthcoming free seminar, "Successfully Implementing 360 Degree Feedback" have been filling up fast, so this an invitation to register for one of the last remaining 4 spaces!

To register a place & receive your invitation, just click below:

 

Go to seminar registration page - 4 spaces remaining

 

By the end of this seminar, you will: 

  • Understand the critical factors that will ensure success when introducing 360 into your business

  • Take away a checklist to help you work logically through the implementation process

  • Appreciate the key principles that will help you design a great questionnaire, communicate effectively to get company wide 'buy-in' and facilitate face-to-face debriefs

Go to seminar registration page - 4 spaces remaining

 

This seminar will be very interactive and allow plenty of opportunity to network with other delegates,discuss best practice and offer ample time for Q & A if you have specific issues to be addressed.

 

We really do hope you can join us for what promises to be a great morning!

 

Go to seminar registration page - 4 spaces remaining

 

Many Thanks

 

John

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Some early results from our Performance Appraisal survey

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We currently have a survey open and are still welcoming feedback on people's experience of Performance Appraisal; there is an opportunity to secure a free line manager training session for your organisation if you participate, and the full results will be sent to you in a report when complete.

To participate, just follow the link below – It's a very short survey and should take no more than 2 minutes:

Implementing Performance Appraisals Survey

Results so far….

Performance Appraisal Flowchart

In the meantime, I thought I would share some early results and indicators which highlight some interesting insights into how organisations are implementing performance appraisals and where the difficulties may lie:

  • Not unsurprisingly, every organisation was conducting performance appraisals, with nearly two-thirds of those reporting above 85% completion rates; this is very encouraging considering that 75% were running these as a paper-based process.
  • Broadly two-thirds again reported that their performance appraisal process had no performance grade or rating, which then produced a similar result for those implementing 'Performance Related Pay'( PRP); the former result may seem more counter-intuitive than the latter. 
  • Of the narrative questions, the responses to what would improve their performance appraisal process, the two themes which are most prominent at this stage are organisational/senior management commitment, coupled with the capabilities of Line Managers to conduct constructive appraisal conversations.

We are going to let the survey run a little longer; these early results suggest there will be some more interesting themes to share and perhaps help spark some ideas for you as to  seek to implement your own Performance Appraisal process.

John

 

 

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Free 360 Degree Feedback Seminar; London, 31st May 2012

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Our popular series of 360 degree feedback seminars continues, so  we would like to invite you to reserve one of the limited number of places at our next free seminar on May 31st 2012, which is being held at:

 

Institute of Directors

123 Pall Mall

London

SW1Y 5ED

 

To register a place & receive your invitation, just click below:

 

Go to seminar registration page

 

By the end of this seminar, you will: 

  • Understand the critical factors that will ensure success when introducing 360 into your business

  • Take away a checklist to help you work logically through the implementation process

  • Appreciate the key principles that will help you design a great questionnaire, communicate effectively to get company wide 'buy-in' and facilitate face-to-face debriefs.

Previous delegate comments include:

 

"Short, sharp and to the point. Well delivered by very experienced consultants. Thank you"

"Very informative and helpful, we came away with some great tips and ideas for our implementation of 360"

"Good relaxed atmosphere and very useful and practical information provided."

 

Go to seminar registration page

 

This seminar will be very interactive and allow plenty of opportunity to network with other delegates,discuss best practice and offer ample time for Q & A if you have specific issues to be addressed.

 

We really do hope you can join us for what promises to be a great morning!

 

Go to seminar registration page

 

Many Thanks

 

John

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5 good reasons to stop doing Performance Appraisals

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We often hear of the debate regarding whether performance appraisals are worth the paper (or screen if on-line…) they are written on, so here are 5 good reasons to just stop doing them.

1. The organisation has no need to clearly define performance expectations; people know what is expected of them, so why have endless conversations about it?

2. Individuals have no interest in how their activities and tasks contribute to the overall goal of the organisation; it's just confusing and irrelevant.

3. Line Managers have enough to do without having to take time out to motivate and engage employees by providing feedback, praise, and helping them in their development & career aspirations.

4. The organisation doesn't need to identify high performers and has no need to implement any form of succession planning; it will be quite obvious to see where the 'talent' is.

5.  HR don't need to co-ordinate and align learning & development needs across the business; individuals will let us know what training they need and when.

Not sure if I need to counter this post with '5 good reasons to start doing Performance Appraisals'….what do you think?

If you want to get a balanced view and some ideas as to how you successfully implement Performance Appraisals, then check out our newly revamped Performance Appraisal whitepaper here.

John

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3 steps to great 360 degree feedback; step 3

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The final step in our '3 steps to great 360 degree feedback' list; follow the links for 'Step 1 – Ask the right questions' and 'Step 2 – Follow a well-structured process'.

Step 3 – Have a great conversation around a great report

 

The most important part! Everything else so far was a HR exercise. This is the part that matters.
 
How the recipient receives the report, reflects on it, and acts upon it is the purpose of this exercise. This is where the development starts. So, a great report. A great report gives back to the recipient all of the information that the respondents contributed. It doesn’t have to be clever or simplify, it just needs to let
them know what was said. 
 
The report below lets people see the whole story. No need to average a “score”. Just reflect back.
 
How do you make this a great conversation?
 
The person who first sits with the recipient and discusses the report with them plays a crucial role. They help interpretation and understanding. They can even start the process of developing the action plan. This person must be trained. Some times they should be external, often they should not be the line manager; whoever they are, they should be trained.

We hope you enjoyed this 3 part series of posts – If you would like to download the latest 360 whitepaper, attend a seminar, listen to a recorded webinar, have an online system demonstration or just an old fashioned chat then please get in touch.

John

 

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3 steps to great 360 degree feedback; step 2

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Following yesterday's post which shared 'Step 1 – Ask the right questions' , we now move to the second step as part of the series "3 Steps to great 360 degree feedback".

Step 2 – Follow a well-structured process

Think through the following

  • Who picks the respondents?
  • What level of anonymity do I require?
  • How many respondents should there be?
  • (somewhere between 8 and 15 is a good guess)
  • How are we going to communicate this effectively
  • Explaining the 360 degree feedback process
  • The invitation emails from the system
  • Reminders
  • Availability of reports
  • Who is going to see the report?

And so on…

By thinking this through up front you will give confidence to all of the people involved. Let them know how it is going to work and you leave them to get on with the important part of the job in any 360 feedback process – giving the feedback during the face-to-face debrief.
 
If you would like to attend a seminar, listen to a recorded webinar, have an online system demonstration or just an old fashioned chat then please get in touch.
 
John
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3 steps to great 360 degree feedback

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We are often asked what are the key components that make for great 360 degree feedback within an organisation and know that everyone loves a 'tips list'…so here is our '3 steps to great 360 feedback' list!

 

1. Ask the right questions
2. Follow a well-structured process
3. Have a great conversation around a great report
 
Sound easy? Well, some of those stages require a bit of knowledge and experience to get them just right.
 
Over the this post and following two posts, we will share our high level structure for making sure that you hit these 3 stages perfectly.
 
Step 1 – Ask the right questions
 
If you want to develop a single individual, or you have plans to use 360 degree feedback to develop all members of an organisation then you have to start by making sure that you are going to ask the right questions. How do you do this?
 
Develop your competency framework
 
This will give you benefits in more areas than 360; recruitment, training, career development and cultural change initiatives will all benefit from an exercise in developing a competency framework.
 
Competency framework development is a skilled job –make sure that you develop a framework that is in line with strategy, values, and your future direction. Get down a set of behaviours that is comprehensive for your organisation.
 
Translate the framework into relevant questions for now
 
You don’t need to check the whole competency framework every time for every person. You want to ask relevant questions of relevant people.
 
So, take the framework and make subsets that are relevant to role, or relevant to current initiatives. Your framework may have 12 competencies with 6 behaviour statements each. But asking 72 questions is going to give you completion rate problems and will confuse the picture in the debrief meeting. Have 24-36 questions as a ball park in your mind and get the right questions.
 
Most importantly, add some narrative questions. The rating scale questions will give some insight but it is the written comments of colleagues, direct reports, managers, shareholders, suppliers and customers that will give the true revelations and start the development process. Better to have a short questionnaire with opportunities to add narrative comment than a long, complete questionnaire that
has no narrative questions.

 
If you would like to attend a seminar, listen to a recorded webinar, have an online system demonstration or an old fashioned chat then please get in touch.
 
John
 
 
 
 
 

 

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